July Lake Toho fishing report
Julio 10, 2020 Kissimmee 1 photo
Bass (Largemouth)
Bass (Largemouth)

Trip Summary

It’s the middle of the summer and we’re in what I believe is the secret best big bass time of year. While it is widely known that the best time to catch big bass in Florida is during the winter when things cool down. Nearly everyone I know who lives here has caught their BIGGEST during the summer, including myself. All between June-September. We catch a lot of 8-10 pound bass in the winter but it always seems like the heat of the summer is when the ones over 10 pounds are caught. All of the lakes 3 biggest bass that have been caught were caught at this time. The 17lb lake record, the 16lb that Ed Chancey caught, and the 15lb caught by Captain Jamie Jackson. I wanted to start with this because every year at this time, I get excited. Now lets get into whats happening. The fish have been doing exactly what you expect them to be doing at this time of year, which is much the same as last months fishing report. The best bite has been in the morning. They condense most of their feeding into the morning hours at this time of year. The fishing has been fast early and then slowing to a steady bite after the first two hours. After 11am the bite slows dramatically unless you have a cloudy day. Plus it starts getting hot by then so you’re done also. They’re in basically 4 different things. 1. Running water 2. Hydrilla 3. Shell beds 4. Brush piles. Running water: The locks on all of the lakes are full open right now with all of the rain we’ve been getting, which means fish are stacked up in the cooler water flowing in these areas. You can catch them fast and quick early in the morning for basically the first two hours using crankbaits, topwaters (if they’re busting the top), jerkbaits, and weigthless flukes. The problem with these areas is that their are a lot of smaller fish. Don’t get me wrong you can pop off a 7 or 8 pounder randomly but the majority will all be around 2 pounds. Hydrilla: Much of the fishing at this time of year is focused around the hydrilla. Any hydrilla outside of the Kissimmee grass lines will hold fish. It’s as simple as that. Whether it’s off-shore or near the grass lines their will be fish in it. It’s just a matter of how much and where they are in it. And the best way to find that out is by fishing. Speedworms, frogs(this is the best time of year to throw a frog), chatterbaits, and swimjigs have all been working. Shell beds: Now shell beds can be tricky. They can be tough to find and they usually only bite for the first 2 hours in the morning and then they’re done so you’ve got a short window to catch them. But if you can find one you can really catch them right now. July is without a doubt the best month for shell bed fishing. Both numbers of fish and big fish will be in these areas. They can be caught off of soft plastic worms(or any finesse worm), rattletraps, or topwater if they’re busting the top. Brush piles: Brush piles are like shell beds in the sense that they are hard to find. There are some that are marked with buoys but all of the best ones are unmarked. Once you find some though this is where your best late morning-mid day day bite is going to be. Worms, jigs, and crankbaits have all been working. To sum it all up this is the time of year where you may just catch some of the biggest bass in the lake, and the hydrilla, shell beds, and brush piles are where you’ve got your best chance to catch one. Bass wishes, Capt. AJ
Arthur Jackson
Kissimmee, Florida, United States
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Want to get away from Orlando’s busy streets and experience its most treasured natural resource? You’re in the right place, Lake Toho is the #1 big Bass lake in the state and we fish it full time. This beautiful lake is located near Disney Wor...

Other reports from this captain

October Lake Toho fishing report
October Lake Toho fishing report
Octubre 8, 2020
The fall bite has started and the bass are biting everywhere! The recent cold fronts we’ve had have really kicked the fish into overdrive and they’ve started gorging themselves for the winter. Lake Toho is loaded with hydrilla and just about every patch of it holds good fish. So much so that I’m having trouble deciding where to start each day, because it doesn’t seem to matter where you go, as long as you’re around good hydrilla you’re going to catch good fish. The bite has been so good in some of these spots that I’ve had quite a few days in the last two weeks where we caught 50+ fish! On both shiners and artificials. Now that’s just insane. I had one day where we caught 62 anchored up in just ONE SINGLE SPOT. So where are the bass at? And what are they biting? Well like I said before, hydrilla. Mainly offshore hydrilla but some up shallower has been producing also. As long as you’re around hydrilla that’s deeper, there’s fish in it. I guarantee you. And catching them hasn’t been all that difficult either. Shiners of course are the #1 option and your best bet for catching the most and biggest bass that Lake Toho has to offer. Especially if you only have one day out there. But as far as artificials go, the jerkbait has become king again. I can sit in certain areas with the right weather and literally just catch one after another, after another on it. All ranging from 1-7 pounds. Between the jerkbait, chatterbait, swimjig, and good old fashioned worm, I can go through an area and literally feel like I’m catching EVERY SINGLE fish that is there. If you want to learn how I use a jerkbait I’ve got an excellent video of it on my YouTube channel that you can watch here The bass fishing on Lake Toho just seems to be getting better and better as the months go by and we inch closer to winter. Whether you live nearby or would like to book a trip down here with us at AJ’s Bass Guides, I’d say now’s the time to get out and fish this hot spot of a lake. Bass wishes, Capt. AJ
September Lake Toho fishing report
September Lake Toho fishing report
Septiembre 1, 2020
The bass fishing on Lake Toho has been more consistently good than I have ever seen it! And it’s because of one thing, the FWC. I have to say the FWC has done a great job of managing these lakes and listening to us these last couple of years and we are all able to pick the fruits of their labor now. With the reduction of spraying and killing the hydrilla it has allowed for massive populations of fish to concentrate in it. Which in turn has lead to the consistent fishing. They’re spraying it the way they should be now. They’re letting it grow and only killing off what impedes travel. With so much grass left in the lake, if you have the right weather (a cloudy day with a decent wind) it’s almost like you can catch them off of anything right now. As you’ve probably already figured out, the majority of the bass are on hydrilla right now. Their are also good populations of fish on the eel grass around the edges of the lake which the fish will use just like the hydrilla. It’s also worth mentioning that the eel grass populations are as high as I’ve seen them. The whole lake is just in great shape. The only other cover worth fishing right now are the brush piles. There are still good groups of fish on them. The shell bed and running water areas have slowed up and the fish are not using them as they once were. As I said earlier when you have the right weather it’s as if you can catch them off of anything you want! But for the most part speedworms, chatterbaits, and swimjigs have been working the best for moving baits and worms and creature baits have been working well both in the hydrilla and brush piles just slowly dragging them through. You can also get on a good flipping bite later in the day on some of the hydrilla mats coming out from the Kissimmee grass line and even on some of the Kissimmee grass points coming out into the lake. The lake is fishing really well right now and as long as you have a decent wind putting a 20 pound bag of fish in the boat has been nearly everyday! Whether you’d like to use artificials or shiners, a day on lake Toho is going to be a good one. Bass wishes, Capt. AJ
Lake Toho June fishing report
Lake Toho June fishing report
Mayo 22, 2020
Welcome back everyone! Hope you all are doing well. Thankfully most places have opened back up here or are set to open back up soon here in Florida. I’m just happy we were all able to fish throughout the whole thing. But anyway we are back to guiding here at AJ’s Bass Guides and if you’ve been following any of our social media then you know what kind of fish the lake has been producing here lately. Some real monsters. We’ve been getting 8 pound plus size fish almost everyday! It’s been truly incredible. And it’s all because of the unique way the lake is setting up and how the FWC has been managing it. The fish are all off-shore right now. It’s where you need to be. Or at least outside of the grass line. Because of the increase in temperatures and the lower water levels that they keep the lake at this time of year in anticipation of our rainy season; most of the fish have moved outside of the Kissimmee grass, reeds, and lily pads that surround the lake. So what are the fish on out there? 3 things. 1. hydrilla 2. shell beds 3. brush piles. Bass have begun to start schooling on the shell beds early morning and late in the afternoon. But only during these times. The hydrilla and brush pile bites can last all day depending on the weather. With rain beginning to start up in the afternoons now the feeder creeks and canals that lead into and out of the lake are going to start to become a factor once water begins to flow. The lake has seen some extreme pressure over the last few months. Mostly because no one had anything else to do except for fish! One day I counted 42 boats around me fishing the same area and the next weekend I counted 56! All fishing the same area within cast distance of each other! I’ve never seen anything like it and still the lake has been producing trophy sized fish even better now than then. I believe that’s just a testament to how many bass (and BIG bass) really are in this lake. As always large golden wild shiners have been what the best bite has been on and is what most of the giants we’ve been catching on our charters have come off of. But artificials have been working extremely well also. Rattletraps, jerkbaits, speedworms, chatterbaits, and swimjigs have all been producing good bass. All 5 have been producing in the hydrilla and it really just depends on the water color what color lure I’d use. As always if the water color is dirtier for the speedworms, chatterbait, and swimjig use a darker color like junebug and for the rattletrap and jerkbait use a gold shiner colored one. If the water is cleaner use more of a natural color like green pumpkin or watermelon for the speedworm, chatterbait, and swimjig and you can go either or shiner color or shad color for the jerkbait/rattletrap. Whichever kind of bait fish you can see around will help you make the decision. For shell beds and any creeks and canals/moving water; rattletraps, jerkbaits, worms on the bottom, and a spook style bait for topwater have been producing fish early in the morning and in the evening. For the brush piles it’s been simple. Just a worm or speedworm used slowly like a worm has been producing the fish off of those spots. The lake has been fishing incredibly well for big fish lately and let me tell you what, if you’re looking for a new PB, right now’s the time to be fishing Orlando’s lake Toho. Bass wishes, Capt. AJ